What a Week (but Standing Strong)

It’s Friday – does anyone else feel totally exhausted today? Not your normal Friday afternoon exhausted, but emotionally exhausted.

This week has been a tough one for our beautiful city, and for the family and friends of those affected by the shooting. I cried for Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, as I also cried for the outpouring of love and strength that resulted from this tragic event.

Today our city honoured Cpl. Cirillo in a moving ceremony, as the Ceremonial Guard is reinstated at the National War Memorial. Although I wasn’t there, the support I witnessed through video and photos makes me exceedingly proud of our city and our country.

My children are too young to know what happened here this week. When they are old enough to understand, I hope they will listen to the stories about October 22nd.  And I hope they will feel a deep sense of respect for the people who have lost their lives in the battle against senseless violence.

Canada Strong and Free

Photo credit: Deborah Laplante

I hope Ottawans continue to tell their stories – continue to post pictures and words – for many years to come. As with all the wars in which we have fought, the honouring of lives lost may one day help to foster peace for the future.

Lest we forget

What does your community need?

Have you seen the #CBCStreetTalk team in your neighbourhood? Our local CBC Ottawa team has been busy visiting city wards to speak with residents about local issues (because unless you have your head buried in the sand, you’ll know that we have upcoming municipal elections on October 27th!)

ward 1

The question they’re asking is: What would make your neighbourhood a better place to live?

This got me thinking about ways I would like to improve my own neighbourhood. Choosing where to live in a city is a tough decision – many middle class families can’t afford the trendy and vibrant areas like Westboro, Hintonburg and the Glebe. And although I sometimes yearn to be closer to downtown, I do appreciate the big property and quiet that comes with suburban living.

But I want to have my cake and eat it too! How come I can’t live in a trendy suburban neighbourhood? Most of us in the older part of Orleans are within walking distance to St. Joseph – but the walkability of our ward is dismal. Who wants to walk around places when you could break your ankle on a broken sidewalk or get run over by a speeding car?

Those complaints aside, I love my neighbourhood and I can’t wait to see it flourish! So here’s my wish list for Orleans, Ward 1:

  •  A great local coffee shop within walking distance (bonus points if the coffee shop has a playroom for kiddies!)
  • A redesigned “Main Street” (St. Joseph) – making it pedestrian and cyclist friendly
  • More healthy, fabulous restaurants using local ingredients
  • A revival of the Ottawa Farmer’s Market, which seems to be dying a slow death in Orleans
  • Ottawa River Action Plan for the health of our river and Petrie Island!
  • More attention paid to the trail system in Queenswood Heights – the bridges which are being replaced have been chained off for over a year now. There was also a major landslide down there, and I’d love to hear how this will be cleaned up and future stability managed.
  • Future LRT (check out this fascinating idea about demolishing the Queensway!)
  • Promotion of cycling to downtown – I discovered this past year it only takes me 1 hour and 15 minutes to bike to work (if that seems crazy to you, it’s also possible to bike partway and bus partway). We need more education around safe cycling, and campaigns to get more people on their bikes!

So tell me, how would you make your neighbourhood a better place to live?

Why The Office is Bad for Pregnancy (and how to make it healthier!)

You might have heard that our sedentary lifestyle is slowly killing us. When we work 8-9 hours a day sitting at a desk, come home, and plop ourselves down in front of the TV, we know we’re doing our body a disservice. But what choice do we have? Money needs to be made, and our jobs are sometimes stressful (hence why we zone out in front of the TV every night).

ForInternetUse-MistyFinal-16

But all the risks associated with our choices seem so far off in the distance. It’s hard to take cardiovascular disease seriously when there’s a “chance” that we’ll develop problems. The payoffs we get now (money, power, job satisfaction) outweigh the negative impacts we may experience years down the road. That’s why it’s so hard to change – getting more exercise, eating better, and lowering stress have long-term benefits. Our brains are hard-wired to want what we want RIGHT NOW.

However, pregnancy is a short time in our lives. Long enough that we can appreciate what our bodies are putting us through, but short enough that we can see the outcome. And office life can have some detrimental effects on pregnancy and birth. But the good news is that short-term positive changes can be made to facilitate a healthier and less stressful pregnancy. And when we can see the benefits (i.e. a healthier mommy and a healthier baby), then we’re much more motivated to make changes.

I’ve worked in an office for many years, and have never had an issue with sitting for long periods of time, typing all day long, and working under fluorescent lighting. Never, that is, until I got pregnant. Pregnancy changed my body, and made it hard to handle the demands of office life.

So here are some tips/tricks I learned along the way:

1) If possible, try to work from home or negotiate “flex hours” with your manager. Even 2-3 days a week at home can give you a much needed break from the fake lighting and lack of fresh air. Plus, you’ll save time on your commute, which will give you the opportunity to get a bit of housework done or go for a walk.

2) Drink lots and lots of water. Office buildings have recirculated air, which can make them stuffy and dry. Keeping yourself well hydrated is a must.

3) Get up frequently – every 10 minutes. Go to the bathroom (not hard when your bladder is getting squished); take a quick trip to the water cooler; go for a walk around the building; or just do some stretching by your chair.

4) Sitting - we have an epidemic of malpositioned babies here in Ottawa. Some suspect it’s because most of us are government/office workers, and we spent a lot of time reclined back in our chairs. This encourages our babies to take the “sunny side up” position, which can make labour and birth long and difficult (usually resulting in more interventions). One way to fix this is to buy an exercise ball to sit on instead of your office chair. This encourages you to arch your back, open your legs up wide and strengthens your core muscles.

5) Activate your commute. Park your car a 15 minute walk from work, which will force you to get 30 minutes of physical activity each day (try to do a power walk). If you take the bus, get off at a stop further away from the office, which again helps you to work in some short bursts of activity.

6) TV at night is still OK – just remember what I said above about posture and positioning. If you’re watching TV at night with your hubby, bust out your yoga mat, and do some stretches. Or sit on your exercise ball instead of the couch. Even better? Turn off the TV and sign up for a yoga class!

Did you have an office job while pregnant? How did you keep yourself healthy? (or how do you keep yourself healthy today?These tips are important for us non-preggers as well!)